Oddly enough, my personal connection with this soup has nothing to do with its Greek origins. When I was a teenager, I was fortunate enough to take a trip to Mexico and the first meal I had in Mexico City started off with a bowl of avgolemono soup. It was a bowl perfect for the occasion. Creamy. Bright. Soothing after hours of travel.

I was thinking about that soup recently and decided to make a version of my own.

This recipe can either take a few hours or be done in 25 minutes. Myself, I work 12 hour days. On days that I work, the longer version isn’t an option unless I want to wait until 9:30 to eat dinner. To avoid relying on takeout too often, I’ve started looking for shortcuts based on my schedule and available equipment.

I did much of the advance prep on Sunday by making the stock and cooking/preparing the chicken. (See below.) The rice I made in my Instant Pot pressure cooker. 1 cup arborio rice to 2 cups chicken stock on the rice setting. It took 12 minutes rather than an hour on the stove. Alternatively, you can use store bought broth, the meat from a rotisserie chicken and instant or par-cooked rice to save even more time. With the pressure cooker and my chicken & stock already done, I had dinner ready in under 25 minutes.

Avgolemono Soup

Avgolemono Soup

Recipe: Avgolemono Soup
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Soup
Cuisine: Greek
Serves: 6-8 servings
Ingredients
  • 6 cups chicken stock
  • 2 cups cooked rice
  • 3 yolks from large eggs
  • Juice from 3 lemons
  • 1 pound (or thereabouts) shredded cooked chicken meat
  • Salt
  • Pepper
Instructions
  1. In a saucepan or dutch oven, season the stock with salt and pepper and bring to a simmer.
  2. Add the rice, stirring to incorporate it in the broth.
  3. Add the chicken and lemon juice to the pot, stir and let simmer for 5 minutes. Turn off the heat.
  4. In a medium-sized mixing bowl, whisk the egg yolks together. Very slowly, a spoonful at a time, add the warm broth to the egg mixture, whisking constantly. (This slowly warms the eggs and keeps them from scrambling.) When the egg/soup mixture is warm to the touch, whisk it back into the soup pot.
  5. Adjust lemon, salt and pepper to suit your taste and serve.
  6. Enjoy!
Notes
Based on the size of your lemons, I'd start out with a conservative amount of juice and then adjust up as you like.

Adapted from Max & Eli Sussman's recipe from This Is a Cookbook.

Have a little more time? Make your own stock. It is easy, inexpensive (if you watch the sales!) and you can control the seasonings/sodium levels in your soup.

Bone-in chicken breast was on an absurdly good deal at a local grocery store. I grabbed my 6 quart dutch oven and loaded it up with the chicken, onion, shallots, scallions, carrots, sweet mini peppers, garlic, salt, pepper and a splash of apple cider vinegar. The veggies I use usually varies based on what I have in the fridge. I simmered it for a few hours on Sunday in anticipation of making this soup on Monday. Once it was done, I strained the broth and put it in the fridge. I picked the meat off of the bones. And voila! The most time-consuming part of the soup was done. I had around 2.25 quarts of stock and a nice amount of meat on the ready.

Making Stock

Making Stock